TOP 10 Tractors

TOP 1 FARMALL
MODEL H

OVERVIEW

MANUFACTURER
International
Harvester

FACTORY
Rock Island, IL

PRODUCTION
1939-1953

TOTAL BUILT
391,227
PRICE $2,000 (1953)

ENGINE
4 cylinders,
152 cid

DRAWBAR
HORSEPOWER
24.2 (tested)
SOURCE: TRACTORDATA.COM

The second of International Harvester's legendary letter series tractors, the two-plow H debuted to instant acclaim in 1939, about a month after the A. Its five-speed gearbox and 24-hp overhead valve engine put it squarely in the sweet spot for midsized row-crop farmers. IH sold 391,227 of these sturdy, versatile tractors, and it sometimes seems that at least 390,000 are still on farms working or enjoying an honored retirement.

FARMALLWonderful Surprise
Sixty-five years ago I took out a bank loan to buy this brand new Farmall H. Through the years it filled many needs, from cultivating fields of grass seed to mowing and baling hay. When our two boys graduated from college and chose to come back to the farm, though, the old Farmall began to fade into the background, replaced by tractors with air-conditioned cabs, power steering and bigger engines.      
Then one day, unbeknown to me, they had the Farmall repainted. What a wonderful surprise! The H now resides in my shed. When I occasionally wander out to start it, the little tractor always responds loyally. And it's never needed an overhaul in 65 years.
ALFRED AMOLDUS SUMMERVILLE, OREGONFARMALL

Jodie's Pride and Joy
This Farmall H and Farmall C have been in use on our 120-acre farm ever since my husband, Jodie, started farming here in 1946. We have bigger, newer tractors, of course, but sometimes the Farmalls are just right for jobs the big boys can't do.      
In 2005 Jodie spruced them up with a new paint job. I think you can tell from the photo that these tractors were his pride and joy. He passed away in April 2014, but he was so proud of his Farmalls that I had to respond to your article on his behalf.
SUSAN FIELDS CLINT, TEXASFARMALL

Takes Two to Cultivate
I'll never forget the first time I walked into the corn house on my uncle's dairy farm and saw that brand new H with its gleaming red paint. It was beautiful! And it had a sound all its own.      
When I was a teenager I worked on his farm in the summers, and we used the H for almost everything. My specialty was cultivating, since I was the only one on the place who liked to do it. One Fourth of July my girlfriend--who's now my wife--came out and rode on the drawbar to keep me company while I worked. That prompted a neighbor to comment at church, ''I noticed that it takes two people to cultivate corn at your place!''      
My cousin still farms with that tractor and proudly takes it to the Farmer's Fair parade in the fall.
LEE BENTZ GETTYSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA

Like a Whole New Tractor
Dad bought a new H in 1942. Rubber and electronics were being diverted to the war effort, so it didn't have lights or tires. That's my sister and me in the wagon behind Dad. The H also didn't have an electric starter, which almost got it drowned.      
One evening Dad left the tractor parked by the creek and a big storm hit that night. With the creek about to overflow its banks the next morning, he couldn't get the H started. By the time our neighbor got there with his horse team, the water was several feet deep, but they managed to pull the H to higher ground.      
When World War II ended we bought rubber tires, which was like getting a new tractor. After Dad got a full-time job, I did most of the farming until I went into the Army. While I was away Dad traded the H for a Ford 8N, but the H will always be my favorite.
RONALD REED WICHITA, KANSASFARMALL

TOP 2 FORD
MODEL 8N

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
Ford Motor Co.
FACTORY
Highland Park, MI
PRODUCTION
1947-1952
TOTAL BUILT
524,000
PRICE $1,404 (1952)
ENGINE
4 cylinders, 120 cid
DRAWBAR
HORSEPOWER 22 (tested)
SOURCE: TRACTORDATA.COM

The 8N is the first Ford tractor produced after Henry Ford II dissolved his grandfather Henry Ford's handshake partnership with Harry Ferguson, who patented the three-point hitch.    
The new tractor, still using the Ferguson System, boasted some 20 improvements over the 2N, including a four-speed transmission, a tip-out grill for cleaning, improved steering and an upgraded brake system and hydraulic lift. Both the left and right brake pedals were placed on the right side, allowing simultaneous use of the clutch and both brakes.     
The 8N soon accounted for 25 percent of tractor production in the U.S.--the highest sustained production rate of any model--and sales averaged more than 400 tractors a day during its run of more than 5 years.

1948 Ford 8N1948 Ford 8N restored by Robert and Jean Hubbs of Maryville, Tennessee.

Souped-Up Sod Buster
I've restored and shown many tractors over the years, but my 1952 Ford 8N is my favorite. In 1988 I used a Funks Aircraft Kit to convert the V-8 engine from my mother's 1952 Ford car to fit the 8N. The tractor, with its 100-horsepower flathead engine, will do twice the work of a regular 8N and do it 10 percent faster. I also installed a special transmission to slow it down, along with a few other special features to make it my own.     
The whole family loves to show my 15 tractors in parades. My wife, Dorothy, no longer drives tractors, so I added a seat for her behind me on the 8N (below). To celebrate our 65 years together, Dorothy and I sent Christmas cards showing the Ford and us all decked out for the holiday.      
I've heard from people across the U.S. and even Canada and Scotland regarding our 8N, which has been featured in books and magazines. It's brought me a lot of pleasure.
RUFUS ROBERTS CORTLAND, OHIO

Worth the Wait
Due to World War II shortages my parents, Alvin and Minnie Van Zee, had to put their name on a waiting list for a Farmall M tractor. Meanwhile, my grandfather was on a waiting list for a Ford. His name came up first and he gave my father his turn. That's how Dad bought a brand-new Ford 8N in 1947.      
I remember when Dad and my uncle repaired the clutch. They parked the tractor under a shade tree, tied chains to a strong branch sticking out and split the tractor in half to get inside.      
Another time Dad couldn't get the Ford started in cold, rainy weather, so he took the distributor off, dried it in our oven on a low temperature, reinstalled it after about an hour and started up the tractor.     
I was so proud when I was old enough to plow with the Ford. My brother used the proceeds from selling two pigs at the market to buy two new back tires for the Ford --the same ones that are still rolling on it today!
NANCY VAN STEENIS MONROE, IOWA

TOP 3 FARMALL
MODEL M

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
International Harvester
FACTORY
Rock Island, IL
U.S. PRODUCTION
1939-1952
TOTAL BUILT
270,140
PRICE $2,400 (1952)
ENGINE
4 cylinders, 248 cid
DRAWBAR HORSEPOWER
33.1 (tested)

With its five-speed gearbox, powerful overhead-valve engine and sleekly modern sheet metal from famed industrial designer Raymond Loewy, the M took the row-crop market by storm and earned an enduring spot in many ''milestone tractor'' lists. The diesel version, introduced in 1941, was the first diesel farm tractor. After a remarkable 14-year production run, the nearly identical Super M--sporting 22 percent more horsepower--replaced it in late 1952.

Hirmon's Favorite
I started out driving my grandpa's F-20, so I was really impressed when I drove my first M. It was streamlined, big and powerful. It had headlights and an electric starter, so I didn't have to worry about getting kicked when I started it. Best of all, it was fast. Road gear was 20 miles per hour!     
My close neighbor and friend Hirmon Speicher bought a new M in 1947. He said it was the first tractor he owned ''that had enough power to really get some work done.'' It was his big tractor for many years, and it remained his favorite even after he got bigger tractors with cabs and air conditioning. He continued to use it for light work until he quit farming in his 80s. Then he mowed roadsides and pastures with it.      
When he could no longer drive, I'd stop by to talk and listen to his stories about farming in the old days. Sometimes I'd fire up the M for him, because he liked to hear it run. I offered to buy it once, but he said, ''I'll never sell that tractor. It won't go until I go.''      
But one day he just gave it to me. Hirmon passed away last March when he was almost 98. So Hirmon's M is my all-time favorite tractor, not only because I like it, but because I value the long friendship I had with the man who gave it to me.
HARLISS BIRT WABASH, INDIANA

It Was a Very Big Deal
After World War II, soldiers returning to the farm got the first pick of new tractors as they rolled off the assembly lines. Dad got a new Farmall M in September 1945 just in time to plant wheat. It was a very big deal.     
Dad bought it from Woodworth Hardware in Halstead, Kansas, but it was delivered by rail to Newton, about 10 miles away. My mother, Lucretia, my sister, Janelle, and I waited to watch him drive up the lane to our home.     
I spent a lot of time on this tractor when I was a kid. We used it to plow, cultivate, put up hay, work ground, haul wheat, cut wood and run the threshing machine and silage blower.      
In 1998 I restored the old M and named it Roaring Orville after my dad. I have a lot of fond memories of the M and the McCormick-Deering W-30 Dad bought in 1936. They were almost like members of the family.
KENT HAURY HALSTEAD, KANSAS

TOP 4 JOHN DEERE
MODEL B

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
John Deere
FACTORY
Waterloo, IA
PRODUCTION
1935-1952
TOTAL BUILT
357,456
PRICE $1,900 (1952)
ENGINE
2 cylinders, 190 cid
DRAWBAR HORSEPOWER
(tested)
11.8 (1934)
24.6 (1947)

1944 John Deere Model BJust a year after the Model A's debut, John Deere released its compact counterpart, the Model B, which featured the same four-speed transmission and front-wheel options at two-thirds the size. The nimble, affordable B became so popular that it outsold all of John Deere's two-cylinder models, including the A. Throughout its 17-year production run, the trusty little tractor evolved with the rest of the John Deere fleet, undergoing major redesigns in 1938 and 1947 before the Model 50 took its place in 1952.

Old Faithful
My all-time favorite tractor is a 1944 John Deere Model B that my father bought used in 1950 when I was 4 years old. I remember the day it was delivered to our California farm, and it's been here ever since.     
The B was my father's pride and joy. We repainted it in 1988, and I still use it on my small beef ranch. It's not the newest tractor we have, but it's the most reliable. It can sit in the barn for months, but every time I uncover it, turn on the fuel, set the choke, turn on the ignition and spin the flywheel, it starts right up within a crank or two. And I've never once gotten stuck in muddy fields--the tall 38-inch wheels and light weight make it perfect for wet conditions.      
I always tell my wife, Gloria, and daughter, Gina (in the photo above), that no matter what, the B is never to be sold off this ranch. Sometimes I joke that if nothing else, when I am gone and they don't want the B, they have to dig a big hole and bury it right here on the ranch where it's worked hard for more than 60 years.
AL MARCUCCI PETALUMA, CALIFORNIA

A Family Legend
My very favorite tractor is one I have never actually driven or seen: a wide-front John Deere B that my grandfather and dad bought in 1949. This was almost 20 years before I was born, but Dad's stories of the B have fascinated me since I was a boy.      
One of my favorite tales is about the time Dad and Grandpa got their pulpwood truck stuck in a ditch. When they tried to pull it out, the B just dug ruts in the gravel road. So a neighbor hooked on with his big new DC Case. But the front of the Case kept bucking up off the ground. Finally, Dad hooked the B to the front of the Case, and together the two tractors pulled the truck from the ditch.      
For much of its life, the B had a Farmhand F-10 loader mounted on it, and every job the B was called on to do, it did well. My family eventually traded the B for a UB Minneapolis Moline. I once put an ad on the Internet looking for Dad's B (serial number 242243), but got no response. If anyone owns this B, I'd love to see--or buy--the tractor I've heard so much about.
ERIC MICKELSON OKLEE, MINNESOTA

All-Weather Workhorse
John Deere Model BMy father bought this 1935 John Deere B in 1942 and used it for general farming. After winter storms, he used to run over the cattle lot to break up the ice. He also built an A-frame snowplow to clear our country road. After my father's death in 1967, the tractor remained in the garage until my husband, Jerry, decided to restore it. We have trailered it in many parades and are always amazed at the attention it gets, especially from people who grew up in the 1930s and '40s.
NEVA SCHMUTZLER
ST. JOSEPH, MISSOURI


 

TOP 5 JOHN DEERE
MODEL 4020

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
John Deere
FACTORY
Waterloo, IA
PRODUCTION
1963-1972
TOTAL BUILT
184,879
PRICE $10,345 (1972)
ENGINE
6 cylinders, 404 cid (diesel)
DRAWBAR HORSEPOWER
(diesel, tested)
83.1 (1969)

John Deere Model 4020After leapfrogging over the competition with its New Generation line in 1960, Deere didn't spend much time resting on its laurels. The company sold nearly 60,000 4010s in three years, then upped the ante with more horsepower and an optional Power Shift transmission on the 4020. In 1969 Deere added another seven drawbar horsepower, more convenient controls and optional cab and air conditioning to the tractor that set the stage for our modern era of farm tractors.

Nothing Runs Like a Deere
My all-time favorite tractor is the 1968 John Deere 4020 diesel that still occupies shed space on the farm today. My Grandpa Robert bought it used in the mid-1970s. It has the M&W turbo kit and has never been short on power. We used it to chiselplow, moldboard-plow and disk as well as grind feed for the farrow-to-finish hog operation. I spent every Saturday of my childhood grinding feed with that tractor.      
I was about 9 years old when I started driving the 4020. I couldn't reach the clutch and brake pedals even with the seat all the way down, so Dad would wire the seat down so it was safe for me to drive. As long as the wire held we were in business. When it didn't hold, I had to either wait for Dad at the end of the field or ride the edge of the seat to use the brakes to help turn at the end rows. I also remember the Syncro-Range transmission being a little confusing to my young mind. Somehow, though, I always seemed to find the right gear.       
This tractor originally had a Year-A-Round cab, but it was a real cooker inside that thing most of the year. About the only time the cab came in handy was when you were miles from the shed and got caught in a downpour. About 25 years ago, my dad, Gerald, decided it was time to take the cab off and put on a set of fenders. That was the best thing we ever did to that tractor.       
We also have another 4020 diesel, a 1964 model. My dad bought it in the mid-'80s at a farm sale to replace a 4010 diesel that had been stolen from the farm. The old 4010 had more than 10,000 hours on it, and according to Dad it had never been overhauled. Dad and Grandpa would be proud to know the old Deeres are still in action on our farm.
STEVE ROBINSON PARIS, ILLINOIS

John Deere 4020He's the No. 1 Fan
I've owned many tractors over the years, but the John Deere 4020 is my favorite. I own three 4020s and would buy more if my wife would allow it. I take them to shows and parades, but they're primarily working tractors used daily on our farm. The 4020 is dependable in cold weather; it has a long wheelbase that makes it stable at high speeds and a smooth ride in rough fields. Its seat is very comfortable and the diesel engine is very fuel efficient. The resale price is almost always more--and sometimes many times more--than the original price.
DARYL BRIDENBAUGH PANDORA, OHIO

TOP 6 JOHN DEERE
MODEL A

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
John Deere
FACTORY
Waterloo, IA
PRODUCTION
1934-1952
TOTAL BUILT
300,000
PRICE $2,400 (1952)
ENGINE
2 cylinders,
309 cid (1934)
321 cid (1940)
DRAWBAR
HORSEPOWER (tested)
18.7 (1934)
34.1 (1947)

John Deere AAmid the struggles of the Great Depression, John Deere dared to release its new Model A, billing it as an affordable, easily maintained, all-purpose tractor. With innovative adjustable rear wheel width and high-clearance one-piece transmission case, the A put Deere on the leading edge of tractor design. And in 1938, industrial designer Henry Dreyfuss made the A look the part with curvy new ''styled'' sheet metal.      
After many updates, which included nearly doubling the horsepower, John Deere replaced the A with the model 60 in 1952. But the A will be forever hailed as one of the company's trailblazers.

A Step Up
Near the end of my high school days, my father purchased this 1949 John Deere A. It was a real upgrade from our 1941 B, which didn't have nearly as much power. I spent a lot of time operating the A over the next few years.      
I remember the first time Dad started plowing with it, he couldn't even get it across the field before it started stalling out. We called a serviceman, and he discovered there was a pinhole in the carburetor float. After we got it up and running, the A served us well over the years.      
Except for a paint job, the A has had very little service since we first bought it. It's still running, just not working anymore. It is now retired to my collection, and I show it at various tractor shows.
LOREN A. FULTON CALEDONIA, OHIO

Tractor Tribute
Dad had this 1936 John Deere A for as long as I can remember. He passed away in 1969, and Mom gave it to me when she sold the farm a few years later. Then it sat in a shed for 25 years before my son convinced me to restore it. I think Dad would be happily surprised at how good it looks now.
ROGER MESTAD
STEWARTVILLE, MINNESOTA

Miraculous Recovery
John Deere AMy father-in-law, Harold Crabb, bought this 1947 John Deere A in 1970 and used it into the mid-'90s. Then it sat until I restored it in 2008. My mother-in-law, Pat, was convinced the tractor would never run again, so I was thrilled to prove her wrong.
BRIAN JENSEN PORTAGE, WISCONSIN
John Deere A

TOP 7 FARMALL
MODEL A

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
International Harvester
FACTORY
Chicago, IL
Louisville, KY
PRODUCTION
1939-1947
TOTAL BUILT
117,552
PRICE $750 (1947)
ENGINE
4 cylinder, 113 cid
DRAWBAR HORSEPOWER
16.3 (tested)

Farmall AThe Farmall A was International Harvester's response to the revolutionary Allis-Chalmers Model B, which was aimed squarely at persuading farmers with less than 100 acres to replace their horse teams. The B had a long, narrow torque tube, which made it easier to see the crop and one-row cultivator. IH incorporated a similar design, and upped the ante by offsetting the driver's position a little to the right to provide what it called ''Culti-Vision,'' putting the operator in a better position to line up the row between the cultivator shovels. That and the affordable price made the A a favorite among small farmers--as it still is today.

It's a Great Garden Tractor
I had a 1951 Super A when I got married, so I recently went to an auction looking to buy one. The one I saw there was in bad shape, but I met a man who was selling his dad's tractor. It not only looked great, it had a one-row planter I could use to put in my garden and hill up potatoes. So I bought it. My wife and I belong to an antique tractor club, and every August we take the Super A and our Allis- Chalmers B to a big get-together, where everybody has a great time talking about our shared love of old iron. And, of course, our greatest gift is when the grandchildren come up to ride the tractors.
RANDALL HAMILTON WHITESVILLE, KENTUCKY

A Workhorse Named Little A
In 1951, my dad bought his second tractor, a Farmall that we called Little A. It came with a hand clutch that Dad kept for many years; he thought it was handy because he could move the tractor short distances without climbing up on the seat.      
Dad taught my brother and me how to pull the hay rake and loads of straw with Little A the summer after we turned 9. We also used it to pull a stoneboat with feed and water to our sows at farrowing time. Because the A was small, Dad trusted me to take care of the hogs myself when I was in junior high. It quickly became my favorite tractor, and it still is today. My brother in turn taught his three children and his two oldest grandsons to drive on the A, and we recently put new tires on it so we can keep using our little workhorse on the farm.
LILLIAN SCHOUTEN MARKESAN, WISCONSIN

Like Father, Like Son
We bought our 1945 A from a family friend. It had been sitting outside for more than 10 years and had even been through several floods. My 14-year-old son, Cory, and I did a complete restoration, using all the original parts. This was our first restoration, and it wasn't easy. But what a thrill when it fired right up after a few turns of the hand crank!
STEVE GHIGGERI RENO, NEVADA

TOP 8 FORD
NAA 'GOLDEN JUBILEE'

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
Ford Motor Co.
FACTORY
Highland Park, MI
PRODUCTION
1953-1954
TOTAL BUILT
128,965
PRICE $1,560 (1954)
ENGINE
4 cylinders, 134 cid
DRAWBAR HORSEPOWER
26.8 (tested)

For its 50th anniversary year, Ford unveiled the Model NAA as the replacement for its venerable 8N. The new tractor sported a stylish, rounded edge hood and a prominent emblem above the grill with ''Golden Jubilee Model, 1903-1953'' around the Ford logo and a cornstalk badge. The NAA has been known as the Golden Jubilee ever since.      
The NAA featured an all-new overhead valve Red Tiger engine, optional live PTO, a slower reverse gear, stronger front axle, larger fuel tank and an engine driven hydraulic-control pump with a separate hydraulic fluid reservoir.      
In the two years that Ford offered the NAA before renaming it the Model 600, the versatile little tractor became a legend that lives to this day.

Bookend Jubilees
A 1953 Ford Golden Jubilee was my first tractor right out of high school. Since my parents died when I was young, I was on my own on their place and farmed 80 acres with the Ford for several years. I had all the three-point attachments for it: plow, disks, drag, planter and so on.      
I also used John Deere tractors for a long time, but I'm 74 now and haven't farmed for many years. A couple of years ago I found a Jubilee with a loader and blade and bought it to move snow and grade roads. It was a nice find that brought back a lot of fond memories.
JOE BERTRANG HENDERSON, MINNESOTA

Nellie's a Real Tomboy
Ford Golden JubileeWhen moving to the country in 1991, we knew farm living would require the power of a time-tested workhorse like the 1954 Ford Jubilee we purchased for $1,500 (below). We dubbed her ''Sweet Nellie'' because no matter the task, she was up to it with steadiness and strength. In 23 years, Nellie has only required a mechanic once--when her gas line froze during a particularly arctic winter.      
The slanted four-cylinder engine was built to run on leaded gas, so my husband, Steve, mixes a lead additive to regular gas to keep Nellie running smoothly. With no power steering, she requires strong arms to drive, but her four speed transmission still works as slick as ever. An emblem verifies her authenticity as part of the two-year Golden Jubilee celebration.      
Nellie's front-end loader and wide rear blade have helped us carve out our family's life in the country. She has pulled dozens of laughing, singing children in a wagon for family reunion hayrides. From the time they were toddlers our kids have settled into her seat for a sunset ride. Whether it's putting in a backyard basketball court, leveling areas for family football games, cutting and hauling trees, plowing snow or carrying gravel, Sweet Nellie has been a constant and hard-working force on our farm.
TRILL DREISTADT
GIRARD, PENNSYLVANIA

Happiest on a Tractor
Our family acquired a new Ford Golden Jubilee in 1953 to help with multiple chores around the farm. The tractor was gorgeous with its gray and red colors and an engine with the typical Ford tractor sound.    
Some of the happiest moments of my middle-teen years were spent driving the Jubilee--just that beautiful tractor and me. Dear memories indeed.
JOHN GILKEY VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON

TOP 9 ALLIS CHALMERS
MODEL WD45

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
Allis-Chalmers
FACTORY
West Allis, WI
PRODUCTION
1953-1957
TOTAL BUILT
90,382
PRICE $2,400 (1956)
ENGINE
4 cylinder, 226 cid
DRAWBAR HORSEPOWER
37.8 (tested)

Allis-Chalmers WD45Wearing 1939 sheet metal and looking like just another WD, the 45 caught everyone by surprise. Its four-cylinder engine, featuring the newly designed Power-Crater combustion chamber, cranked out 25 percent more horsepower than the regular WD, which pushed it up into the four-plow class. In 1954 A-C rolled out a six-cylinder Buda diesel engine that produced 39.5 drawbar horsepower. And in 1956, the WD45 became the first A-C farm tractor to get power steering. It quickly became a farmer favorite for offering four-plow power at a budget-friendly price.

Bright Orange Delivery
Even though I was very young, I'll never forget when our WD45 pulled up to the farm. It was New Year's Eve, and a flatbed truck backed up into our driveway where they unloaded the bright orange tractor, then loaded up our tired, faded Case AC.      
The WD came with wide-set front tires, a hand clutch, a pulley to run our grain thresher and hay blower, a battery-powered engine crank and a hydraulic port to operate our offset disk.      
Dad modified the WD to take a three-point hitch while maintaining the tongue, which we could remove in less than five minutes. We also installed a swivel spotlight on the left fender for night work. Dad added water to the rear tires for better traction. When I was 3, I sat on his lap while he drove it. By age 8 I was taking loads of fertilizer to the meadow by myself.      
Everyone in the family spent many years on that tractor. It was a real sentimental favorite.
ROBERT ELLIS WOODS CROSS, UTAH

Prepare to Jump
I grew up on a dairy and row crop farm in southeast Missouri, and the first motor in my life was a one-cylinder International, which powered a milking machine. Horses were our main power source, but we slowly replaced them with tractors.      
My favorite was our Allis-Chalmers WD, which had live power takeoff with a hand slip clutch that ran in oil. The WD was the best at powering the silage cutter. The slip clutch allowed us to reduce ground speed when the cutter was overloaded.       
There was one near disaster with the WD, which was my fault, not the tractor's. My brother had gotten the rear wheel stuck in a ditch. As I was trying to pull the WD out with our truck, the right rear wheel ran into an old tin culvert. With a front-end loader that made it unbalanced, the tractor flipped. Luckily, my brother saw the culvert coming and jumped out of the way just in time. We remarked later that it was lucky he'd been a paratrooper in World War II--it gave him jump training!
GLEN SNIDER ELLIJAY, GEORGIA

Good as New
Allis-Chalmers WD45My wife's father bought this 1954 WD45 new and used it on his farm in Blissfield, Michigan. Betty and I bought it from her brother and completely restored it. Betty still drives it in local parades.
FRANK LOVELAND HENDERSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA

Allis-Chalmers WD45


 

TOP 10 ALLIS CHALMERS
MODEL WC

OVERVIEW
MANUFACTURER
Allis-Chalmers
FACTORY
West Allis, WI
PRODUCTION
1933-1948
TOTAL BUILT
178,202
PRICE $1,341 (1947)
ENGINE
4 cylinder, 201 cid
DRAWBAR HORSEPOWER
24.2 (tested)

Allis-Chalmers WCThe Allis-Chalmers WC has the distinction of being the first farm tractor to come with rubber tires as standard equipment from the factory. (Rubber was an option on the A-C Model U in 1932.) It was also the first tractor with a ''square'' motor, where both the bore and stroke were 4 inches. Its light, sturdy steel-channel frame, individually controlled hand-operated rear brakes and sliding-gear transmissions with four forward speeds made the WC a favorite among row-crop farmers and one of the company's all-time best-selling tractors. Largely because of the popularity of the WC, Allis- Chalmers' share of the tractor market quadrupled in the first part of the 1930s. After a successful run of a decade and a half, the WC was replaced with the WD.

Father-Son Project
Allis-Chalmers WCMy dad, Jim Carrier, helped me restore this 1944 Allis-Chalmers WC that I bought for $600. I take it to fairs and shows, and pull in the 3500-weight class.
CHAD CARRIER CORRY, PENNSYLVANIA

Change of Heart
We originally bought this 1940 Allis-Chalmers WC for parts, but we decided it would be fun to restore instead. It took us two years to finish, but it looks beautiful now. It is used to pull a grain drill, hay rake and wagons.      
Allis-Chalmers WCIn the restoration spirit, we also took a 1947 Allis-Chalmers WC and transformed it into a loader. It's a useful tractor we enjoy and get much use out of on the farm.
PETE AND LINDA HILLIS HUNKER, PENNSYLVANIA Dad's Three-Bottom WC
I believe the Allis-Chalmers WC was one of the best all-around tractors. My dad bought a 120- acre farm north of Parkers Prairie, Minnesota, in 1948. He farmed for a few years with a Ford 9N, but traded it in for a styled WC with a two row mounted corn picker, mower and cultivator.      
The tractor needed an overhaul in the early '50s, so Dad installed an engine kit from M&W to increase horsepower and put on wider tires. In 1954, he sold his farm to take over the family farm, where he mystified neighbors by pulling a three-bottom Oliver plow with the little WC. As far as I know, he never told them how he did it.
BEN NYGAARD MAPLE, WISCONSIN

Always an Allis-Chalmers Fan
My very first tractor memory was a WC with a two-row cultivator and Farmhand loader. At my young age, I didn't have the strength and size to drive it. It had a hard-to-push clutch pedal, handbrake levers and long gearshift lever located away from the driver's seat, out of my reach. But when our shiny new WD arrived, I could drive. Like most beginning drivers, my first experience was in the hayfield pulling the rack while the men picked up and loaded hay bales. It was easy to steer and shift.      
After the WD, we continued supporting the Allis-Chalmers brand. We had a CA, G, WD45, D-14 and D-17. They all were great tractors that made our work on the farm a whole lot easier.
JERRY OXBOROUGH SUWANEE, GEORGIA

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