Markets

Coffee Cools Off Despite Demand

Call it the coffee paradox. The beverage has never been more popular, but the price of beans is at its lowest point in over a decade and down by a quarter since October.
 A pound of wholesale arabica beans, the premium variety favored in most coffee shops, has been selling for less than $1 since early March on the Intercontinental Exchange in New York, below what many producers say it costs to grow and process. Coffee drinkers might not have noticed any difference in price, given the prevalence of the $5 latte.

Growers' New Clout Tilts Farm Economy

Across the U.S. Farm Belt, the balance of power is swinging away from multibillion- dollar agribusinesses. For over a century, companies such as Cargill Inc. held sway over markets for U.S. corn, soybeans and wheat, quoting prices to farmers who trucked their crops to company grain elevators.
 Cargill and its peers would then market crops to food and beverage makers across the country. Now farmers are increasingly calling the shots. Running expanded, consolidated farms, big farm operators are pushing grain giants for better prices or striking their own deals

Cranberry Industry Bit by Tariffs

Cars and steel may be grabbing all the headlines as trade tensions mount, but countries that really want to needle the U.S. are springing retaliatory tariffs on the cranberry.
 A quintessentially American export, cranberries are nearly all grown in the U.S. and Canada. It is a trade duopoly, and most of the cranberry bogs in the U.S. happen to be in House Speaker Paul Ryan's home state of Wisconsin.
 “If cranberries get too expensive, they start using raisins or